Posts by darrenjac

Sunglasses must have to save vision $

Sunglasses must have to save vision

Sunglasses must have to save vision

Accessories make an impression. But this accessory is a 'necessity,' because it saves your vision. Sunglasses provide flexible and unparallel protection from damaging UV rays. They are not just for fashion conscious adults, but also equally essential for young and old. An appropriate and quality sunglass will save your vision and save your life. Let's elaborate on the inevitability of the sunglasses:

1. Prolong your vision: On a bright sunny day or a sky filled with clouds, nothing can save your eyes from ill- effects of Ultra Violet sunrays. The UV rays not only harm your vision but cause long time effects like Cataract and Macular degeneration. But UV rays cannot penetrate through sun glasses. Sun glasses also protect your eyes from pre-mature aging and under eye wrinkles that are after-effects of UV rays.

2. Shield from wind, dust and debris: If you drive, ride a bike or pursue water or snow sport, then you can't do without sunglasses. Often wind or dust hits you while driving, can cause severe harm to your eyes. You can avoid this harm by wearing sun glasses. Wrap style sunglasses are good defense from wind, water or debris.

3. Guard against glares: Reflections from different surfaces cause glare. You have to be cautious against these glares while driving, riding or boating. While driving sharp glare often blind you for a moment or two. If you are without sun glasses, it may cause accidents. Polarized sun glasses have reflective coating, are best recommended to beat the glares.

4. Provide correct vision: Too much or too little light, both are harmful for the eye. Every eye needs balanced light to function. Excess light can damage the retina and you may slowly lose vision. Sunglasses improve the vision.

5. Protection against headaches and eye strain: If constant headaches trouble you then ensure wearing sunglasses. Everyone gets troubled by access light on a bright sunny day. To avoid this, we tend to squeeze are eyes too much and too often. We squint our eyes and it causes muscle strain, which in turn, causes headache. So, if you are regularly wearing sun glasses, you can avoid such headache and strains.

Ultra Violet rays are most damaging between 10am and 2pm. Beware, do not venture out without sun protection during this part of the day. To protect your eyes from UV rays, ensure wearing sunglasses Labeled "UV 400".

There are numerous brands selling trendy and stylish sunglasses to suit your taste. The different types of lenses are available in sunglasses to choose from are:

1. Mirror or flash coated are highly reflective lenses. They are best suited for those working in bright light conditions like, skiing on a sunny day.

2. Gradient lenses and Double Gradient glasses are tinted glasses. Gradient glasses have dark grains on the top and lighter in the bottom. While double gradient ones are dark at top and bottom and light in the middle. They are good for riders and drivers.

3. Photo chromatic glasses adjust light according to the light exposure.

4. Polarized are anti reflection glasses. They are best suited for water and snow sport.

Whatever sunglass you must choose but never compromise on the quality. Whether a sport freak or daily office gore, just remember, sunglasses are a must to wear. Better buy one for your children too. They also need protection for their eyes. They will certainly enjoy and appreciate, be for the style part of it only.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

About the author: Amanda Kidd is a blogger who is a fashion freak and loves experimenting different styles. She is always on a look out for new hairstyles and is currently planning to go for red hair.

Price: $ 0.00

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Sunglasses must have to save vision

$

Accessories make an impression. But this accessory is a 'necessity,' because it saves your vision. Sunglasses provide flexible and unparallel protection from damaging UV rays. They are not just for fashion conscious adults, but also equally essential for young and old. An appropriate and quality sunglass will save your vision and save your life. Let's elaborate on the inevitability of the sunglasses:

1. Prolong your vision: On a bright sunny day or a sky filled with clouds, nothing can save your eyes from ill- effects of Ultra Violet sunrays. The UV rays not only harm your vision but cause long time effects like Cataract and Macular degeneration. But UV rays cannot penetrate through sun glasses. Sun glasses also protect your eyes from pre-mature aging and under eye wrinkles that are after-effects of UV rays.

2. Shield from wind, dust and debris: If you drive, ride a bike or pursue water or snow sport, then you can't do without sunglasses. Often wind or dust hits you while driving, can cause severe harm to your eyes. You can avoid this harm by wearing sun glasses. Wrap style sunglasses are good defense from wind, water or debris.

3. Guard against glares: Reflections from different surfaces cause glare. You have to be cautious against these glares while driving, riding or boating. While driving sharp glare often blind you for a moment or two. If you are without sun glasses, it may cause accidents. Polarized sun glasses have reflective coating, are best recommended to beat the glares.

4. Provide correct vision: Too much or too little light, both are harmful for the eye. Every eye needs balanced light to function. Excess light can damage the retina and you may slowly lose vision. Sunglasses improve the vision.

5. Protection against headaches and eye strain: If constant headaches trouble you then ensure wearing sunglasses. Everyone gets troubled by access light on a bright sunny day. To avoid this, we tend to squeeze are eyes too much and too often. We squint our eyes and it causes muscle strain, which in turn, causes headache. So, if you are regularly wearing sun glasses, you can avoid such headache and strains.

Ultra Violet rays are most damaging between 10am and 2pm. Beware, do not venture out without sun protection during this part of the day. To protect your eyes from UV rays, ensure wearing sunglasses Labeled "UV 400".

There are numerous brands selling trendy and stylish sunglasses to suit your taste. The different types of lenses are available in sunglasses to choose from are:

1. Mirror or flash coated are highly reflective lenses. They are best suited for those working in bright light conditions like, skiing on a sunny day.

2. Gradient lenses and Double Gradient glasses are tinted glasses. Gradient glasses have dark grains on the top and lighter in the bottom. While double gradient ones are dark at top and bottom and light in the middle. They are good for riders and drivers.

3. Photo chromatic glasses adjust light according to the light exposure.

4. Polarized are anti reflection glasses. They are best suited for water and snow sport.

Whatever sunglass you must choose but never compromise on the quality. Whether a sport freak or daily office gore, just remember, sunglasses are a must to wear. Better buy one for your children too. They also need protection for their eyes. They will certainly enjoy and appreciate, be for the style part of it only.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

About the author: Amanda Kidd is a blogger who is a fashion freak and loves experimenting different styles. She is always on a look out for new hairstyles and is currently planning to go for red hair.

Extreme Sports Need Great Goggles $

Extreme Sports Need Great Goggles

Extreme Sports Need Great Goggles

I have a dear friend who decided years ago that the sport for him would be snowboarding. He set upon developing his skills in this sport the way that many people do – he went shopping.

Man, oh man! Does Snowboarding gear look cool! The boards! The clothes! The gloves! The goggles! I adore the beginning of new adventures because stocking up on necessities is always the best part! My friend went all out, bought the “Best of Everything!!!” he bragged – - – before his trip, that is.

He came back a little less enthused. Beside the fact that Snowboarding is a hugely difficult sport (for a man who hadn’t seen more than 2 inches of snow accumulate at any one time) the gear he loaded up on didn’t really suit his needs.

He had tried the clothes and boots on in the store, they were fine – his biggest problem was the goggles!

Sliding on a pair of good looking protective eye wear in a climate controlled and relaxed setting with a cute snow bunny telling you how adorable that pair of (the most expensive) goggles looks on you is vastly different than swooshing down the slopes, sunlight reflecting off the snow and sweat running down your forehead!

Turns out the goggles he had bought didn’t fit that well with the helmet he had purchased, the lenses weren’t polarized and he fought a vicious glare the entire trip and, now that he knows about Cerjo – he also knows he paid entirely too much money!

If you are an aspiring extreme sportsman Cerjo has a complete line of active eye protection; Cerjo was originally a sports glasses company and then our focus on quality and protection expanded to include fashion glasses. We have a huge selection of ski goggles for men, women and children and most of our goggles have category “3”  lens protection which provides the highest level of sun protection on bright sunny days (we also have some category “2” models for snowy, foggy days). Either model will allow you to ski or snowboard safely.

Price: $ 0.00

Loading Updating cart...

Extreme Sports Need Great Goggles

$

I have a dear friend who decided years ago that the sport for him would be snowboarding. He set upon developing his skills in this sport the way that many people do – he went shopping.

Man, oh man! Does Snowboarding gear look cool! The boards! The clothes! The gloves! The goggles! I adore the beginning of new adventures because stocking up on necessities is always the best part! My friend went all out, bought the “Best of Everything!!!” he bragged – - – before his trip, that is.

He came back a little less enthused. Beside the fact that Snowboarding is a hugely difficult sport (for a man who hadn’t seen more than 2 inches of snow accumulate at any one time) the gear he loaded up on didn’t really suit his needs.

He had tried the clothes and boots on in the store, they were fine – his biggest problem was the goggles!

Sliding on a pair of good looking protective eye wear in a climate controlled and relaxed setting with a cute snow bunny telling you how adorable that pair of (the most expensive) goggles looks on you is vastly different than swooshing down the slopes, sunlight reflecting off the snow and sweat running down your forehead!

Turns out the goggles he had bought didn’t fit that well with the helmet he had purchased, the lenses weren’t polarized and he fought a vicious glare the entire trip and, now that he knows about Cerjo – he also knows he paid entirely too much money!

If you are an aspiring extreme sportsman Cerjo has a complete line of active eye protection; Cerjo was originally a sports glasses company and then our focus on quality and protection expanded to include fashion glasses. We have a huge selection of ski goggles for men, women and children and most of our goggles have category “3”  lens protection which provides the highest level of sun protection on bright sunny days (we also have some category “2” models for snowy, foggy days). Either model will allow you to ski or snowboard safely.

Quality Sunglasses vs. Expensive Sunglasses $

Quality Sunglasses vs. Expensive Sunglasses

Quality Sunglasses vs. Expensive Sunglasses

We all know that sunglasses have become the status symbol du jour - Channel, Dolce and Gabbana, Versace all have their logos stamped across the faces of celebrities and have Mrs. Middle America breaking the bank to get her hands on a pair of each (did I introduce myself? Hi, I’m Mrs. Middle America. And I’m shamelessly addicted to sunglasses.)

I have been through a pair of Channels, a pair of Burberry, and a pair of Coach sunglasses on my quest for a really great pair... but do you know what grabbed me and held on?

Cerjo.

They are a Swiss company who began designing protective eyewear for athletes (Snow Sport increases UV exposure to our eyes by up to 80% by reflecting the rays back at our eyes - the Swiss know a thing or ten about protecting our eyes from this danger). They have expanded, both in their designs and geographically. They now sell sport and fashion UV protection glasses around the globe.

Finding and wearing Cerjo glasses has taught me a very important lesson - there is a difference between expensive sunglasses and quality sunglasses.

Now Cerjo’s aren’t cheap - you won’t get this level of protection from a pair of glasses you pick up at a truck stop from a carousel of shades with a flexy mirror the size of an index card and a price tag of $5.99 tied with plastic across the bridge of your nose - but they don’t cost as much as a car payment.

It seems so basic - two pieces of thin tinted plastic popped into a thick plastic (or metal if it suits your fancy) frame.

How complicated can this possibly get?

As it turns out - much more complicated. There are a myriad of things you can do to those two little discs that can make the difference between, well, night and day to your eyes.

A little research at How Stuff Works turns up this info:

"There are four things that a good pair of sunglasses should do for you:

  • Provide protection from UV rays
  • Provide protection from intense light. (or HEV - High Energy Visible light rays)
  • Provide protection from glare. Certain surfaces, such as water, can reflect a great deal of light, and the bright spots can be distracting or can hide objects. Good sunglasses can completely eliminate this kind of glare using polarization
  • Sunglasses eliminate specific frequencies of light. Certain frequencies of light can blur vision, and others can enhance contrast. Choosing the right color for your sunglasses lets them work better in specific situations.

Cheap sunglasses usually do not address any of these benefits - or in some cases make things worse. If your glasses don’t block the UV rays but do provide shade you are more likely to extend your exposure to the UV rays! You open your eyes wide and let more and more harmful UV rays in, increasing the damage to your retinas."

While most of America (read: ME) is paying top dollar for the frame what we should be doing is paying for quality lenses. Any frame will do - its purposes to hold our lenses in front of our eyes first, look good second.

The qualities of the lens that you should spend your money on are:

I also wanted to know the definition of Polarization, and found this at How Stuff Works:

"Light waves vibrate and radiate outward in all directions. Whether the light is transmitted, reflected, scattered or refracted, when its vibrations are aligned into one or more planes of direction, the light is said to be polarized. Polarization can occur either naturally or artificially.

A simple example of polarization can be seen on the surface of a lake. When you look at a lake you see a reflected glare, this is the light that doesn’t pass through the lake’s surface and is bounced back, this is the reason that you probably can’t see anything below the surface - even if the lake is very clear and very still.

Polarized lenses are most commonly made of by applying a chemical film to a transparent plastic or glass lens. The chemical film is usually made up of molecules that align naturally parallel to each other, thus creating a filter that absorbs any light that matches their alignment, and eliminating the reflective glare.

There are a lot of sunglasses out there being advertised and sold as being “polarizing” that aren’t. Here’s a test you can do standing in the store before you buy - Find a reflective surface, and hold the glasses so that you are viewing the surface through one of the lenses. Now slowly rotate the glasses to a 90-degree angle and see if the glare gets better or worse. If the sunglasses are polarized, you will see that the glare is greatly diminished."

And since I was spending the morning on How Stuff Works, I also wanted their description of tinting:

"The color of the tint determines the parts of the light spectrum that are absorbed by the lenses. Manufacturers use different colors to produce specific results.

  • Gray tints are great all-purpose tints that reduce the overall amount of brightness with the least amount of color distortion. Gray lenses offer good protection against glare, making them a good choice for driving and general use.
  • Yellow or gold tints reduce the amount of blue light while allowing a larger percentage of other frequencies through. Since blue light tends to bounce and scatter off a lot of things, it can create a kind of glare known as blue haze. The yellow tint virtually eliminates the blue part of the spectrum and has the effect of making everything bright and sharp. (Read Why is the sky blue? for more information on this effect.) That's why snow glasses are usually yellow. This tint really distorts color perception, which makes it inappropriate for any activity that relies on accurate color.
  • Amber and brownish tints are also good general purpose tints. They have the added benefit of reducing glare and have molecules that absorb higher frequency colors, such as blue, in addition to UV rays. There has been research that suggests that near-UV light frequencies such as blue and violet can contribute to the formation of cataracts over time.
  • Green tints on lenses filter some blue light and reduce glare. Because green tints offer the highest contrast and greatest visual acuity of any tint, they are very popular.
  • Purple and rose tints offer the best contrast of objects against a green or blue background. They make a good choice for hunting or water skiing.

Many manufacturers employ a process called constant density to tint the lenses. It is the oldest method of creating sunglasses and involves a glass or polycarbonate mixture with a uniform color throughout the material. The tint is built right into the lenses when they are created.

Tinting can also be accomplished by applying a coat of light-absorbing molecules to the surface of clear polycarbonate. The most common method for tinting polycarbonate lenses is to immerse the lenses in a special liquid containing the tinting material. The tint is slowly absorbed into the plastic. To make a darker tint, the lenses are simply left in the liquid longer."

Lucky for me Cerjo has an entire line of glasses that offer the kind of protection I’m not leaving the house without that are also geared towards the fashionista in me. They call the line “Crazy” and they come in both plastic and metal.

I’ve started my collection and now that I know the difference between quality sunglasses and expensive sunglasses I’m only buying the quality my eyes deserve.

I’m only buying Cerjo.

Price: $ 0.00

Loading Updating cart...

Quality Sunglasses vs. Expensive Sunglasses

$

We all know that sunglasses have become the status symbol du jour - Channel, Dolce and Gabbana, Versace all have their logos stamped across the faces of celebrities and have Mrs. Middle America breaking the bank to get her hands on a pair of each (did I introduce myself? Hi, I’m Mrs. Middle America. And I’m shamelessly addicted to sunglasses.)

I have been through a pair of Channels, a pair of Burberry, and a pair of Coach sunglasses on my quest for a really great pair... but do you know what grabbed me and held on?

Cerjo.

They are a Swiss company who began designing protective eyewear for athletes (Snow Sport increases UV exposure to our eyes by up to 80% by reflecting the rays back at our eyes - the Swiss know a thing or ten about protecting our eyes from this danger). They have expanded, both in their designs and geographically. They now sell sport and fashion UV protection glasses around the globe.

Finding and wearing Cerjo glasses has taught me a very important lesson - there is a difference between expensive sunglasses and quality sunglasses.

Now Cerjo’s aren’t cheap - you won’t get this level of protection from a pair of glasses you pick up at a truck stop from a carousel of shades with a flexy mirror the size of an index card and a price tag of $5.99 tied with plastic across the bridge of your nose - but they don’t cost as much as a car payment.

It seems so basic - two pieces of thin tinted plastic popped into a thick plastic (or metal if it suits your fancy) frame.

How complicated can this possibly get?

As it turns out - much more complicated. There are a myriad of things you can do to those two little discs that can make the difference between, well, night and day to your eyes.

A little research at How Stuff Works turns up this info:

"There are four things that a good pair of sunglasses should do for you:

  • Provide protection from UV rays
  • Provide protection from intense light. (or HEV - High Energy Visible light rays)
  • Provide protection from glare. Certain surfaces, such as water, can reflect a great deal of light, and the bright spots can be distracting or can hide objects. Good sunglasses can completely eliminate this kind of glare using polarization
  • Sunglasses eliminate specific frequencies of light. Certain frequencies of light can blur vision, and others can enhance contrast. Choosing the right color for your sunglasses lets them work better in specific situations.

Cheap sunglasses usually do not address any of these benefits - or in some cases make things worse. If your glasses don’t block the UV rays but do provide shade you are more likely to extend your exposure to the UV rays! You open your eyes wide and let more and more harmful UV rays in, increasing the damage to your retinas."

While most of America (read: ME) is paying top dollar for the frame what we should be doing is paying for quality lenses. Any frame will do - its purposes to hold our lenses in front of our eyes first, look good second.

The qualities of the lens that you should spend your money on are:

I also wanted to know the definition of Polarization, and found this at How Stuff Works:

"Light waves vibrate and radiate outward in all directions. Whether the light is transmitted, reflected, scattered or refracted, when its vibrations are aligned into one or more planes of direction, the light is said to be polarized. Polarization can occur either naturally or artificially.

A simple example of polarization can be seen on the surface of a lake. When you look at a lake you see a reflected glare, this is the light that doesn’t pass through the lake’s surface and is bounced back, this is the reason that you probably can’t see anything below the surface - even if the lake is very clear and very still.

Polarized lenses are most commonly made of by applying a chemical film to a transparent plastic or glass lens. The chemical film is usually made up of molecules that align naturally parallel to each other, thus creating a filter that absorbs any light that matches their alignment, and eliminating the reflective glare.

There are a lot of sunglasses out there being advertised and sold as being “polarizing” that aren’t. Here’s a test you can do standing in the store before you buy - Find a reflective surface, and hold the glasses so that you are viewing the surface through one of the lenses. Now slowly rotate the glasses to a 90-degree angle and see if the glare gets better or worse. If the sunglasses are polarized, you will see that the glare is greatly diminished."

And since I was spending the morning on How Stuff Works, I also wanted their description of tinting:

"The color of the tint determines the parts of the light spectrum that are absorbed by the lenses. Manufacturers use different colors to produce specific results.

  • Gray tints are great all-purpose tints that reduce the overall amount of brightness with the least amount of color distortion. Gray lenses offer good protection against glare, making them a good choice for driving and general use.
  • Yellow or gold tints reduce the amount of blue light while allowing a larger percentage of other frequencies through. Since blue light tends to bounce and scatter off a lot of things, it can create a kind of glare known as blue haze. The yellow tint virtually eliminates the blue part of the spectrum and has the effect of making everything bright and sharp. (Read Why is the sky blue? for more information on this effect.) That's why snow glasses are usually yellow. This tint really distorts color perception, which makes it inappropriate for any activity that relies on accurate color.
  • Amber and brownish tints are also good general purpose tints. They have the added benefit of reducing glare and have molecules that absorb higher frequency colors, such as blue, in addition to UV rays. There has been research that suggests that near-UV light frequencies such as blue and violet can contribute to the formation of cataracts over time.
  • Green tints on lenses filter some blue light and reduce glare. Because green tints offer the highest contrast and greatest visual acuity of any tint, they are very popular.
  • Purple and rose tints offer the best contrast of objects against a green or blue background. They make a good choice for hunting or water skiing.

Many manufacturers employ a process called constant density to tint the lenses. It is the oldest method of creating sunglasses and involves a glass or polycarbonate mixture with a uniform color throughout the material. The tint is built right into the lenses when they are created.

Tinting can also be accomplished by applying a coat of light-absorbing molecules to the surface of clear polycarbonate. The most common method for tinting polycarbonate lenses is to immerse the lenses in a special liquid containing the tinting material. The tint is slowly absorbed into the plastic. To make a darker tint, the lenses are simply left in the liquid longer."

Lucky for me Cerjo has an entire line of glasses that offer the kind of protection I’m not leaving the house without that are also geared towards the fashionista in me. They call the line “Crazy” and they come in both plastic and metal.

I’ve started my collection and now that I know the difference between quality sunglasses and expensive sunglasses I’m only buying the quality my eyes deserve.

I’m only buying Cerjo.

Do Children Need Sunglasses? $

Do Children Need Sunglasses?

Do Children Need Sunglasses?

If you are anything like me, you wear sunglasses whenever you are outside, and will stop everything to find them if they are misplaced.

But, while you're on the beach or at the pool, wearing your shades, are your children in sunglasses? Logic tells us that if we need sunglasses, so do they! But I don't see a lot of children wearing sunglasses and I do see a great deal of adults who are.

Parenthood.Com says we need to put sunglasses on our kids!

I'll admit, I feel like a bad mother . . . I've admired 'cute' sunglasses on equally cute kids my entire life, and even though the sun literally hurt my eyes, I never thought about sunglasses for my children.

My guilt comes from an article I read at Parenthood.com.

"Too much exposure to UV rays, especially sunlight reflected off sand or water, can lead to chronic eye disease. [How did I miss this?}

Protect your precious peepers with these sun-blocking tips. Research shows that excessive exposure to UV rays, especially from light reflected off sand, snow or pavement, can cause a painful type of corneal sunburn. The cumulative damage of repeated UV exposure also may contribute to chronic eye disease Fortunately, most children don’t spend all day in the bright sun and they naturally protect their eyes from high light levels by squinting. However, eye protection is particularly important for children who spend all day on the water or at the beach, where there is intense glare."

  • Buy sunglasses that block the maximum amount (99 to 100 percent) of both types of UV-A and UV-B rays, fit closely to the face and have larger lenses for more coverage.
  • In addition to sunglasses, wear a hat to reduce overall exposure to UV rays.
  • Don’t look directly at the sun.
  • Limit the amount of time spent outside during the peak sun hours (10 a.m. to 3 p.m.)

Prevent Blindness America offers these tips to protect children from UV rays:

  • Insist on 100 per cent protection.
  • Make sure the sunglasses fit properly. It's not a winter coat they'll grow into.
  • Be patient – children need to get used to wearing sunglasses.
  • Make sure your child likes the sunglasses and that they are comfortable, or they won't wear them.
  • Consider impact-resistant lenses, which protect your child's eyes from injury.
  • Make sure the frame has features, like spring hinges, that will stand up to the most active child.
  • When children are very young, look for sunglasses with straps or ear pieces that wrap around the ear.
  • Kids with prescription eyewear should have prescription sunglasses or sunclips for their regular glasses.
  • Older kids who wear contact lenses should have non-prescription sunwear for when they're outdoors.

It is definitely time for me to check the children's sunglasses here at cerjoUSA. My children buy their own sunglasses now, but have two grandchildren who can look cute AND protect their eyes in their own 'cerjos'!

Price: $ 0.00

Loading Updating cart...

Do Children Need Sunglasses?

$

If you are anything like me, you wear sunglasses whenever you are outside, and will stop everything to find them if they are misplaced.

But, while you're on the beach or at the pool, wearing your shades, are your children in sunglasses? Logic tells us that if we need sunglasses, so do they! But I don't see a lot of children wearing sunglasses and I do see a great deal of adults who are.

Parenthood.Com says we need to put sunglasses on our kids!

I'll admit, I feel like a bad mother . . . I've admired 'cute' sunglasses on equally cute kids my entire life, and even though the sun literally hurt my eyes, I never thought about sunglasses for my children.

My guilt comes from an article I read at Parenthood.com.

"Too much exposure to UV rays, especially sunlight reflected off sand or water, can lead to chronic eye disease. [How did I miss this?}

Protect your precious peepers with these sun-blocking tips. Research shows that excessive exposure to UV rays, especially from light reflected off sand, snow or pavement, can cause a painful type of corneal sunburn. The cumulative damage of repeated UV exposure also may contribute to chronic eye disease Fortunately, most children don’t spend all day in the bright sun and they naturally protect their eyes from high light levels by squinting. However, eye protection is particularly important for children who spend all day on the water or at the beach, where there is intense glare."

  • Buy sunglasses that block the maximum amount (99 to 100 percent) of both types of UV-A and UV-B rays, fit closely to the face and have larger lenses for more coverage.
  • In addition to sunglasses, wear a hat to reduce overall exposure to UV rays.
  • Don’t look directly at the sun.
  • Limit the amount of time spent outside during the peak sun hours (10 a.m. to 3 p.m.)

Prevent Blindness America offers these tips to protect children from UV rays:

  • Insist on 100 per cent protection.
  • Make sure the sunglasses fit properly. It's not a winter coat they'll grow into.
  • Be patient – children need to get used to wearing sunglasses.
  • Make sure your child likes the sunglasses and that they are comfortable, or they won't wear them.
  • Consider impact-resistant lenses, which protect your child's eyes from injury.
  • Make sure the frame has features, like spring hinges, that will stand up to the most active child.
  • When children are very young, look for sunglasses with straps or ear pieces that wrap around the ear.
  • Kids with prescription eyewear should have prescription sunglasses or sunclips for their regular glasses.
  • Older kids who wear contact lenses should have non-prescription sunwear for when they're outdoors.

It is definitely time for me to check the children's sunglasses here at cerjoUSA. My children buy their own sunglasses now, but have two grandchildren who can look cute AND protect their eyes in their own 'cerjos'!

Wine Country $

Wine Country

Wine Country

Cerjo, parent company to cerjoUSA is in the middle of a little known section of Europe's wine country.  Jacques J Marcotte wrote about Switzerland's wine growing region in Sommelier News in October 2008.  It is definitely worth another read! Switzerland’s Vaud Attracting Interest When people first visit the region of Vaud in Switzerland, all too often they focus on how strikingly beautiful the vineyards are, almost suggesting that the wines themselves are only an afterthought and do not measure up to the beauty of their birthplace. It is a bit sad, considering the emphasis that has been put on improving the quality of the wines across the region in recent years. They remain relatively unknown around the world in part because of their small production and because of the high level of local consumption. So, few people outside of Switzerland ever have the opportunity to purchase and to taste the wines of the Vaud. Located on the slopes of the Lac Léman, the Vaud wine region has had a long and honored history, which was officially recognized in 2007 when UNESCO named the vineyards in terraces of Lavaux a “World Heritage Site,” the result of a fight initiated by local environmentalist Franz Weber in 1972 to protect the wonderful vineyards which are dominated by Chasselas production. The Region The Vaud canton has now four official regions, which are subdivided into 14 sub-regions and 28 AOCs, all this covering over 3,800 hectares (about 9,390 acres): Chablais (from the Latin Caput Laci or Head of the Lake) – 592 ha, where the Rhône becomes Lac Léman before becoming the Rhône again in Geneva (yes, the Rhône does start up in the Valais Alps and not in France), boasts the beautiful Château d’Aigle and its wine museum. The co-ops of Ollon and Yvorne have been doing great work and are now expanding into interesting red assemblage. Lavaux – 821 ha, has its 1,000-year old vineyards in terraces (the UNESCO jewel), overlooking Lac Léman and the French Alps across the lake. This area spreads from Château de Chillon near Montreux to the outskirt of Lausanne. Chasselas truly dominates here, and the most famous wines are from the AOCs of Dézaley, Calamin and St-Saphorin. La Côte – 2012 ha, lies west of Lausanne and almost runs to Geneva. It offers gentle slopes running down towards the lake. We again find here Chasselas-based wines, but there are also interesting reds, such as the excellent 2005 Servagin, a Pinot Noir from Henry Cruchon in Morges. Bonvillars, Côtes-del’Orbe et Vully - 414 ha, is a region made up of three sub-regions nestled against the Jura mountains towards France and along Lake Morat. They are closer to Burgundy, and this may explain the style of some of their wines. Christian Dugon in Bofflens (Orbe) has made great progress with both whites and reds. Grapes, Wines, Terroir Vaud has long been known as the land of Chasselas, a white grape probably brought in during the 12th Century by Cistercian monks, who established monasteries in Lavaux. Chasselas is still the king of the region and is planted on roughly 2600 ha, about 67% of Vaud’s annual production. This grape has adapted nicely to the terroir and what is seen as its weakness (its aromatic subtlety) may really be its strength, allowing the character of the terroir to show best. These wines work well with the local food, the perch and fera (whitefish) from Lac Leman. But Vaud is evolving, and there are now 34 different grapes raised in the region. Terroir is important in Vaud, and its influence is clearly seen in the Chasselas wines. In a recent tasting of two Chasselas wines, 2007 St-Saphorin “Les Déserts” from Domaine Didier Imhof in Rivaz (Lavaux) and 2007 La Colombe from Domaine La Colombe of Raymond Paccot in Fechy (La Côte). The St- Saphorin showed effervescence, excitement but limited structure on the palate; the Colombe showed less effervescence but more structure. Here we are: two distinct wines made from the same grape by two vintners only 30 km apart. The Federal Research Station of Changins has led the way and produced various grape crosses, both in white and red. An example of such a grape is Doral, a cross created from Chardonnay and Chasselas, developed to give more structure and balance. Doral seems to be tried everywhere in Vaud these days, and it certainly shows promise. The Gamay grape of Beaujolais has been around in Vaud for a long time and, in 1970, it was crossed with Reichensteiner (a German white grape) to make two distinct very dark grapes, the Gamaret and Garanoir. These are typically used in blends and they are now gaining in fame as they make well-balanced and structured wines, perfect companions to local game, so popular during the fall season. Some vintners are now experimenting with C-41, the forgotten brother of Gamaret and Garanoir. Pinot Noir is also coming along nicely, as seen in the wines of Morges. The Diolinoir is another example of a local grape, issued in 1970 from a cross between Rouge de Diolly and Pinot Noir. The result is a dark, firm wine which has the ability to age well. Trends The Canton de Vaud has had a long, complex wine history and tradition. It is after all a region showing 42 castles (some over 900 years old), which were all working wine properties, highlighting once again the wine tradition of the region. It is continuing to transform itself as a new generation of vintners comes into play and picks up where the earlier generation leaves off. L’Office des Vins Vaudois is leading the promotional efforts for the region and its vintners. It sponsors many events and knows where to concentrate its efforts, though there is not yet much talk about challenging the world export markets. As Mrs. Zimmerli from the OVV says, “Our production costs remain high, and the volume of topechelon wines remains limited (when looking at world markets). Now is not the time to chase this market, not yet anyway.” In 2004, local wine business powerhouse Schenk created Clos, Domaines & Châteaux. Perceived by some as just a marketing strategy, it brings 19 vineyards under a single banner, committing to a new standard of quality in both viticulture and enology. At about the same time, twelve independent vintners created Arte-Vitis, based on the philosophy of respect for the terroir, the four regions and the alwaysincreasing demand for quality from the consumer. Cruchon and Dugon are two leading members of this association. Most impressive is the work being done by large co-operative producer Uvavins, which leads efforts to bring world-class wines to Swiss consumers and works closely with sophisticated customers such as Nathalie Ravet (GaultMillau Sommelier of the Year 2007) of L’Ermitage de Bernard Ravet in Vufflens-le- Château (a Relais & Châteaux property). This has been a 20- year relationship to bring better wines to the market, and they now have a dozen different wines under the label, Le Vin Vivant de Bernard Ravet. Some interesting examples are: Sizane, an assemblage of six different red grapes, a beauty that will evolve probably over 8 to 10 years Trilogie, a blend of Chasselas, Doral and Pinot Gris One of the greatest joys in Vaud remains the privilege to visit specialized independent shops and learn from their owners who are focusing on small production vintners from the region. Such a place is Au Tastevin, a 41-year old shop situated on the Grand Rue of Morges owned by Olivier Cruchet. The people of Vaud love their wine and the culture attached to it. They probably have more celebrations all year long than any other wine region I have visited. Over the next few years, we will see continued growth and improvement in Vaud wines, and the secret will be finally out: they can make great wines in Vaud. As Nathalie Ravet says, “The trend towards reduced yield will accelerate over the next few years, leading to more availability of better quality wines.” The scenery is indeed spectacular, with most vineyards overlooking Lac Léman and the white peak of Mont Blanc in France, and the wines of the region are constantly improving. It is definitely worth a visit to enjoy all that this part of Switzerland has to offer Reprinted from the Sommelier News Volume 5, Issue 10, October 2008 Written by written by Jacques J Marcotte. Mr. Marcotte is a management consultant and investor in Le Du Wines, LLC in NYC

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Cerjo, parent company to cerjoUSA is in the middle of a little known section of Europe's wine country.  Jacques J Marcotte wrote about Switzerland's wine growing region in Sommelier News in October 2008.  It is definitely worth another read! Switzerland’s Vaud Attracting Interest When people first visit the region of Vaud in Switzerland, all too often they focus on how strikingly beautiful the vineyards are, almost suggesting that the wines themselves are only an afterthought and do not measure up to the beauty of their birthplace. It is a bit sad, considering the emphasis that has been put on improving the quality of the wines across the region in recent years. They remain relatively unknown around the world in part because of their small production and because of the high level of local consumption. So, few people outside of Switzerland ever have the opportunity to purchase and to taste the wines of the Vaud. Located on the slopes of the Lac Léman, the Vaud wine region has had a long and honored history, which was officially recognized in 2007 when UNESCO named the vineyards in terraces of Lavaux a “World Heritage Site,” the result of a fight initiated by local environmentalist Franz Weber in 1972 to protect the wonderful vineyards which are dominated by Chasselas production. The Region The Vaud canton has now four official regions, which are subdivided into 14 sub-regions and 28 AOCs, all this covering over 3,800 hectares (about 9,390 acres): Chablais (from the Latin Caput Laci or Head of the Lake) – 592 ha, where the Rhône becomes Lac Léman before becoming the Rhône again in Geneva (yes, the Rhône does start up in the Valais Alps and not in France), boasts the beautiful Château d’Aigle and its wine museum. The co-ops of Ollon and Yvorne have been doing great work and are now expanding into interesting red assemblage. Lavaux – 821 ha, has its 1,000-year old vineyards in terraces (the UNESCO jewel), overlooking Lac Léman and the French Alps across the lake. This area spreads from Château de Chillon near Montreux to the outskirt of Lausanne. Chasselas truly dominates here, and the most famous wines are from the AOCs of Dézaley, Calamin and St-Saphorin. La Côte – 2012 ha, lies west of Lausanne and almost runs to Geneva. It offers gentle slopes running down towards the lake. We again find here Chasselas-based wines, but there are also interesting reds, such as the excellent 2005 Servagin, a Pinot Noir from Henry Cruchon in Morges. Bonvillars, Côtes-del’Orbe et Vully - 414 ha, is a region made up of three sub-regions nestled against the Jura mountains towards France and along Lake Morat. They are closer to Burgundy, and this may explain the style of some of their wines. Christian Dugon in Bofflens (Orbe) has made great progress with both whites and reds. Grapes, Wines, Terroir Vaud has long been known as the land of Chasselas, a white grape probably brought in during the 12th Century by Cistercian monks, who established monasteries in Lavaux. Chasselas is still the king of the region and is planted on roughly 2600 ha, about 67% of Vaud’s annual production. This grape has adapted nicely to the terroir and what is seen as its weakness (its aromatic subtlety) may really be its strength, allowing the character of the terroir to show best. These wines work well with the local food, the perch and fera (whitefish) from Lac Leman. But Vaud is evolving, and there are now 34 different grapes raised in the region. Terroir is important in Vaud, and its influence is clearly seen in the Chasselas wines. In a recent tasting of two Chasselas wines, 2007 St-Saphorin “Les Déserts” from Domaine Didier Imhof in Rivaz (Lavaux) and 2007 La Colombe from Domaine La Colombe of Raymond Paccot in Fechy (La Côte). The St- Saphorin showed effervescence, excitement but limited structure on the palate; the Colombe showed less effervescence but more structure. Here we are: two distinct wines made from the same grape by two vintners only 30 km apart. The Federal Research Station of Changins has led the way and produced various grape crosses, both in white and red. An example of such a grape is Doral, a cross created from Chardonnay and Chasselas, developed to give more structure and balance. Doral seems to be tried everywhere in Vaud these days, and it certainly shows promise. The Gamay grape of Beaujolais has been around in Vaud for a long time and, in 1970, it was crossed with Reichensteiner (a German white grape) to make two distinct very dark grapes, the Gamaret and Garanoir. These are typically used in blends and they are now gaining in fame as they make well-balanced and structured wines, perfect companions to local game, so popular during the fall season. Some vintners are now experimenting with C-41, the forgotten brother of Gamaret and Garanoir. Pinot Noir is also coming along nicely, as seen in the wines of Morges. The Diolinoir is another example of a local grape, issued in 1970 from a cross between Rouge de Diolly and Pinot Noir. The result is a dark, firm wine which has the ability to age well. Trends The Canton de Vaud has had a long, complex wine history and tradition. It is after all a region showing 42 castles (some over 900 years old), which were all working wine properties, highlighting once again the wine tradition of the region. It is continuing to transform itself as a new generation of vintners comes into play and picks up where the earlier generation leaves off. L’Office des Vins Vaudois is leading the promotional efforts for the region and its vintners. It sponsors many events and knows where to concentrate its efforts, though there is not yet much talk about challenging the world export markets. As Mrs. Zimmerli from the OVV says, “Our production costs remain high, and the volume of topechelon wines remains limited (when looking at world markets). Now is not the time to chase this market, not yet anyway.” In 2004, local wine business powerhouse Schenk created Clos, Domaines & Châteaux. Perceived by some as just a marketing strategy, it brings 19 vineyards under a single banner, committing to a new standard of quality in both viticulture and enology. At about the same time, twelve independent vintners created Arte-Vitis, based on the philosophy of respect for the terroir, the four regions and the alwaysincreasing demand for quality from the consumer. Cruchon and Dugon are two leading members of this association. Most impressive is the work being done by large co-operative producer Uvavins, which leads efforts to bring world-class wines to Swiss consumers and works closely with sophisticated customers such as Nathalie Ravet (GaultMillau Sommelier of the Year 2007) of L’Ermitage de Bernard Ravet in Vufflens-le- Château (a Relais & Châteaux property). This has been a 20- year relationship to bring better wines to the market, and they now have a dozen different wines under the label, Le Vin Vivant de Bernard Ravet. Some interesting examples are: Sizane, an assemblage of six different red grapes, a beauty that will evolve probably over 8 to 10 years Trilogie, a blend of Chasselas, Doral and Pinot Gris One of the greatest joys in Vaud remains the privilege to visit specialized independent shops and learn from their owners who are focusing on small production vintners from the region. Such a place is Au Tastevin, a 41-year old shop situated on the Grand Rue of Morges owned by Olivier Cruchet. The people of Vaud love their wine and the culture attached to it. They probably have more celebrations all year long than any other wine region I have visited. Over the next few years, we will see continued growth and improvement in Vaud wines, and the secret will be finally out: they can make great wines in Vaud. As Nathalie Ravet says, “The trend towards reduced yield will accelerate over the next few years, leading to more availability of better quality wines.” The scenery is indeed spectacular, with most vineyards overlooking Lac Léman and the white peak of Mont Blanc in France, and the wines of the region are constantly improving. It is definitely worth a visit to enjoy all that this part of Switzerland has to offer Reprinted from the Sommelier News Volume 5, Issue 10, October 2008 Written by written by Jacques J Marcotte. Mr. Marcotte is a management consultant and investor in Le Du Wines, LLC in NYC